BACK TO THE COURSE

Camera Angles

One of the most important things to work on that will change your images from a snap to one worth taking note of, is how you hold your camera.

For the duration of this course, try and restrict yourself to first 2 and then 3 different camera angle options.

1.     Overhead (for flatlays, table scenes)

2.     Head On

3.     3/4s a 30-45 degree angle

When taking an overhead image you need to have your lens/phone completely flat to the scene, no tilting left or right and any vertical or horizontal lines, like those in a wooden table top, must be straight. This is where the grid lines on both the phone and DSLR come in handy not just for the rule of thirds but for making sure your lines are straight.

Wonky lines create wonky pictures and you may not have noticed yourself doing it but your head will automatically tilt to try and straighten obviously wonky lines in an image.

The same goes for Head On images. Get your horizon straight.

Full disclosure, if I’m shooting hand held (not on a tripod) despite all my experience I usually have to straighten my photos in Lightroom. It’s so easy to straighten images in free apps like VSCO & Colorstory on your phone that there is no excuse to post or share wonky images! Straighten them first!

The third option, can be tricky because perspective comes into play and if you have very tall elements in the image it can distort so we will cover this option in more detail later.

Of course once you are confident with these 3 options you can make your own creative decisions but I find that in the beginning really focusing on option 1 & 2 makes such a difference in the end result.

 OVERHEAD - Note the straight lines of the wooden table

OVERHEAD - Note the straight lines of the wooden table

 HEAD ON - the camera is level with the bottle and flat to the scene so you are not causing distortion or perspective problems

HEAD ON - the camera is level with the bottle and flat to the scene so you are not causing distortion or perspective problems

 3/4s - the in between angle, takes practise and thoughtful arrangement. If I’d had the bottle up right it would have photographed at a funny awkward angle but leaning it back and away from the camera it all looks normal and just right in this scene.

3/4s - the in between angle, takes practise and thoughtful arrangement. If I’d had the bottle up right it would have photographed at a funny awkward angle but leaning it back and away from the camera it all looks normal and just right in this scene.